Yara Community Gardens Special Projects

Contact person (The person making this entry has the ability to edit this entry in the future. See above for details as to how): 
Lauren Stennett
Email address of primary contact person: 
gardens.hungermj@sasktel.net
Describe the project (This description appears in your map point. Insert a photo if you choose by selecting the "tree" icon): 

Moose Jaw's first community gardens project, the Yara Community Gardens, was established in 2006. Hunger in Moose Jaw currently administers the project. The gardens allow for people from our diverse community, including seniors, youth and families, to rent a plot of land and grow their own pesticide-free, nutritious food. Many clubs, schools, and daycares take advantage of the "living classroom" made naturally at our gardens. In 2008, and again in 2010, our gardens expanded to allow for even more growing space. We currently have 125 individual garden plots throughout the city. The garden plots vary in size from 5'x8' to 20'x60'. The Yara Community Gardens not only provide the opportunity to grow healthy local food, but also allow for communal learning. Sharing gardening techniques, stories and meals brings community members together fostering friendships, food security and the conservation of age-old Saskatchewan gardening practices.

Describe the timing of your project (Please describe the date and length of time the project runs): 

Moose Jaw's first community gardens project, the Yara Community Gardens, was established in 2006. Hunger in Moose Jaw currently administers the project.

In 2008, and again in 2010, our gardens expanded to allow for even more growing space. We currently have 125 individual garden plots throughout the city. The garden plots vary in size from 5'x8' to 20'x60'.

Keywords (Please list keywords, separated by commas, that relate to the project): 
Community gardens
Describe the educational component of the project (e.g. formal education, training, or public awareness advanced by the project): 

Many clubs, schools, and daycares take advantage of the "living classroom" made naturally at our gardens.

The Yara Community Gardens not only provide the opportunity to grow healthy local food, but also allow for communal learning. Sharing gardening techniques, stories and meals brings community members together fostering friendships, food security and the conservation of age-old Saskatchewan gardening practices.

Throughout the gardening season, we offer several different public workshops. Workshops are taught by both special guests and the Coordinator. Some workshops offered in previous years have been:

 Introduction to Vegetable Gardening

 Alternatives to Pesticides

 Water Conservation in the Garden

 Introduction to Intensive Gardening

 Creating Healthy Soil

 

What level of education does this project address?: 
Public awareness, for example, through the media (informal education)
Professional and other training outside the formal school/higher education system (non-formal education)
How did you find out about this survey?: 

Data from 2011 Recognition Event